4 in 4 weeks!

Well sort of. I knit 4 sweaters in 4 weeks, and not baby sweaters either. This statement is mostly true. I did knit 2 sweaters in about 5 days each, my Carbeth, which I showed in a previous post and this one: Tegna, from Caitlin Hunter.

35191008-Unknown

I almost got rid of this yarn. I had 3 skeins of Americo Cotton/Alpaca which I had bought ages ago. It was a rather dull grey/beige. I overdyed it with navy and now it is greyish-beigish-blue, much better! My gauge was looser than the pattern so it went quickly. Since this isn’t exactly a summer sweater (alpaca), I added 3/4 sleeves and made it longer. I think I had about 2 gm of yarn left! It is a bit itchy (alpaca) but I have a high threshold.

Now to the truthy section of my 4 in 4 weeks. I also finished this sweater, Shadow by Olga Buraya-Kefelian, from Brooklyn Tweed Vol. 1.

35191072-Unknown

Yes, Volume 1. That was quite a while ago. 6 years and change, ago. I would have guessed that I started this 3-4 years ago? So I now I really feel like I’m hurtling to the abyss since 6 years flew by like 3. But enough existential angst. As you can see, the sleeve bottom is a bit wonky. The sleeve turned out looser and longer than planned (hey, did you know that your gauge on a project might change AFTER 6 YEARS???) I will probably chop off the ribbing and tighten it up, leaving the length at just above my wrists. I think. I have extra yarn and loads of time apparently.

And then the 4th sweater that I finished is this beauty, Helsinki, by Janine Bajus (who taught at the Needlers’ retreat last year):

35453552-Unknown

I cannot even begin to express how much I love this yoke (she has a hat pattern with the same motifs which I plan on making too). Of course I should have finished this sweater last year, in time for the retreat, but of course I didn’t. Better late than never. I added length to the sleeves and knit it a bit looser and longer and with ribbing than the original pattern. This is a bottom-up pattern, but my modus operandi for these is bottom-up and then top-down. I use a provisional cast-on for the body and both sleeves, knit about an 1″ and then join them up and knit the yoke as per the pattern. Then I knit down, adjusting width and length and trying it on as I go. This method works fine if the colourwork is limited to the yoke above where you join the armhole because when you pick up the stitches and knit downwards you are 1/2 a stitch off from when you are knitting upwards.

So now I feel very selfish and guilty (but secretly a little bit self-satisfied – guess it’s not a secret anymore). Which means I have to knit for others a bit before indulging myself to knit for myself again. I will be heading off to see the grandkids soon, so am whipping up some crustacean kitsch for them.

This is going to be a pullover with a crab and I will knit a lobster for my other little guy. I am back to using invisible floats which makes knitting intarsia tolerable. It is working out quite well with the Berroco Comfort, even though the yarn is acrylic/nylon. I can’t get enough of sea-creature themed knitwear! I will, at some point, knit myself a cardigan with crabs on it. A simpler version of the Chesapeake Jacket. With stripes and a few crabs thrown in so that I will actually finish it in this decade. Hopefully before Cape Cod is washed away into the ocean.

I will leave you with Frankie striking a rather regal pose in a completely superfluous shawl for such a hairy dog.

rsz_35453504-unknown

Free Patterns!

I’ve knit a few samples these past few weeks. One with our new colourway Corrosion and the other with a Quintet set. So here they are for your knitting pleasure.

Quint

IMG-6528

This took one Quintet kit, 5 x 30 gm skeins. It is an easy pattern, exact amounts are not crucial. A kitchen scale would be handy since it is based on knitting at mostly 10 gm per section per ball.  Blocked size: 58″ wide and 29″ deep

Materials:

1 Quintet set (I used 3 ply sock but any base will do)

4 mm needles. I am a loose knitter so you could always go up to 4.5 mm if you are a tight knitter.

Kitchen scale

Gauge:  unblocked gauge 16 stitches x 32 rows, blocked gauge 18 stitches by 22 rows – I just pinned it to a clothesline and let it dry hanging rather than pinning out.

Pattern:

Cast on 3 stitches with colour A.

Set up row: slip 1 purlwise with yarn in front (s1pwyf), knit to end. Repeat for one more row.

  1. s1pwyf, knit front & back (kfb), knit to end.
  2. s1pwyf, knit to end.

Repeat these two rows until you have used 20 gm of yarn.

*Note: when switching colours, you will be slipping the first stitch of the previous colour then bringing the next colour up to your needle from the front, not the back, to kfb in the next stitch.

Add colour B, knit rows 1 and 2. Change to colour A, knit rows 1 and 2. Continue alternating until you have used 10 gm of colour B and almost all of colour A so that you don’t run out of colour A until you have completed row 2. Knit 10 gms of rows 1 and 2 with colour B.

Add colour C, knit rows 1 and 2. Change to colour B, knit rows 1 and 2. Continue alternating until you have used 10 gm of colour C and almost all of colour B so that you don’t run out of colour B until you have completed row 2. Knit 10 gms of rows 1 and 2 with colour C.

Add colour D, knit rows 1 and 2. Change to colour C, knit rows 1 and 2. Continue alternating until you have used 10 gm of colour D and almost all of colour C so that you don’t run out of colour C until you have completed row 2. Knit 10 gms of rows 1 and 2 with colour D.

Add colour E, knit rows 1 and 2. Change to colour D, knit rows 1 and 2. Continue alternating until you have used 10 gm of colour E and almost all of colour D so that you don’t run out of colour D until you have completed row 2. Knit approximately 18 gms of rows 1 and 2 with colour E (or more – just make sure you have enough to bind off).

Bind off using your preferred stretchy bind-off. I used Jenny’s Surprising bind-off, but the standard lace bind off is fine too. (Knit the first two stitches, slip them back onto left-hand needle, knit 2 together through the back loop [k2tbl], one stitch on right-hand needle, *knit next stitch, slip them back onto left-hand needle, k2tbl*, repeat until all stitches are bound off.)

Number of garter ridges:

  • 55 garter ridges (so 110 rows) in A, 11 garter ridges each when alternating A+B.
  • 10 garter ridges in B and 7 ridges each B+C.
  • 7 ridges in C, 6 each C+D.
  • 6 ridges in D, 5 D+E.
  • 9 ridges in E. This is a rough guide since numbers could be different for you depending on your gauge.

Corrosion Cowl

IMG-6444

Materials:

1 skein of sock yarn (Riverside studio MCN Twist in Corrosion) and two mini skeins (15 gm x 2 of Copper & Zinc)

3.75 mm needle (3.5 or 4 will do, the size might change a bit).

Gauge: 19 stitches x 39 rows after light blocking. Final size: 23″ long (46″ round) and 8.5″ wide.

Pattern:

Cast on 224 stitches with main colour (MC). Join in the round, place marker for beginning of round.

Knit 1 through the back loop (k1tbl), purl 1 for 5 rounds.

Knit 2 rounds. Join contrast colour (CC) for Broken seed stitch:

  1. CC: k1, p1 to end of round.
  2. MC: Knit to end of round
  3. CC: p1, k1 to end of round.
  4. MC: knit to end of round.

Repeat these 4 round once more (8 rounds total)

Knit 4 rounds with MC.

*K1tbl, P1* for 5 rounds.

Knit 2 rows.

Knit 2 repeats of Broken seed stitch (8 rounds total).

Knit 6 rounds in MC.

Knit one set of Broken seed stitch (4 rows)

Knit 5 rounds in MC.

Knit 2 repeats of Broken seed stitch (8 rounds total).

*K1tbl, P1* for 5 rounds.

Knit 5 rounds in MC.

Knit 2 repeats of Broken seed stitch (8 rounds total).

*K1tbl, P1* for 5 rounds.

Loosely bind off.

35453520-Unknown

Frankie would look better in the Corrosion Cowl but he took off on me after this picture. He is an unreliable model!